Integrity Curriculum Advocacy Call On The Catholic Education Unit

Home / News / Integrity Curriculum Advocacy Call On The Catholic Education Unit

Integrity Curriculum Advocacy Call On The Catholic Education Unit

Integrity Curriculum Advocacy Call On The Catholic Education Unit

The leadership of LeadAfrique International has called on Mrs. Doris Ashun, the General Manager of Catholic Education Unit and the Greater Accra Regional Manger of Catholic Schools, Mrs. Josephine Assibi Asooh to present the new Basics in Integrity curriculum to them. They discussed ways of integrating the new integrity curriculum into Catholic Schools. With funding from STAR-Ghana Foundation, LeadAfrique International has been working in partnership with the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NaCCA) and Dr. Charles Oppong of the Department of Arts Education of the University of Cape Coast to develop a curriculum that teaches integrity in a well organised and consistent way for students and young people in the country. The Basics in Integrity curriculum comes with a Student Reader, Facilitator Manual and an animation for both.

Mrs. Ashun, the General Manager of Catholic Schools, said ‘the Catholic Education unit meets once every year with the managers to plan and strategise programmes and activities.  With 958,720 students nationwide across our educational institutions, getting the curriculum institutionalised in Catholic Schools will greatly help to cultivate a new generation who do the right thing”.

LeadAfrique International has embarked on a mission to advocate for the integration of the integrity curriculum in Ghanaian schools for all young people to have clear understanding of corruption, its impact, the nature and how to keep away from it. This mission also seeks to include ‘INTEGRITY’ as a subject in the junior and senior high schools in Ghana.

LeadAfrique International seeks to partner with the Catholic Church of Ghana, since the Catholic Bishops Conference have taken an initiative to fight against corruption.’ Most Rev. John Bonaventure Kwofie, the Bishop of the Sekondi Diocese said “the church has a role to play in checking corruption and it is time for other religious bodies to take a firm stance to fight the canker”. That, he said was the best way to ensure a society free of corruption and other environmental issues.

If the over 950,000 students in Catholic schools across the country can be impacted, then the issue on corruption will be extremely reduced. And if all point out the ills of one another in a non- provocative manner and do the right thing, then society will be free of corruption.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.